The right way to do what’s right: Labor Manual outlines whistleblower protection

From the USPS News Link Archives | April 13, 2006
(with links updated)

You hear about “whistleblowers” almost every day in the news — employees who do the right thing ethically by disclosing wrongdoing in an organization.

The Postal Service protects you from retaliation for protected disclosures. These could include allegations of violations of law, rules or regulations; gross waste of funds; gross mismanagement; abuse of authority; or substantial and specific dangers to public health and safety. Persons making disclosures are protected from reprisal unless they knew that the information disclosed was false, or they acted with willful disregard for the truth or falsity of the disclosure.

If you have witnessed any of this conduct, whistleblowing is the right thing to do. And there’s a right way to do it to make sure you are protected. Disclosures are protected if made within an employee’s supervisory chain (but not to the alleged wrongdoer), to Congress, the media or the Office of Inspector General (OIG).

You can find the details in the Employee and Labor Relations Manual Section 660, Conduct, subsection 666.3, “Whistleblower Protections,” and in Title 5 U.S. Code, Inspector General Act, Section 7, “Complaints by employees; disclosure of identity; reprisals.”

whistle2The USPS OIG is responsible for investigating whistleblower reports, and any alleged reprisals against whistleblowers if there is reason to believe that management actions were taken against them because of protected disclosures.

If you believe you are the victim of reprisal for blowing the whistle, you should file a report via the OIG website: https://www.uspsoig.gov/form/whistleblower-complaint-form, by e-mail at: hotline@uspsoig.gov, by phone at 1-888-USPS-OIG, or by mailing USPSOIG Hotline, 1735 N. Lynn Street, Arlington, VA 22209-2020.

Reporting wrongdoing is the right thing to do. It protects the Postal Service’s future and the public’s trust in us. That’s why you’re protected too.

via USPS News Link | April 13, 2006.

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